On Pride

writing

Featured Image: Jeanne Manford marching with her son during the 1972 New York City Pride Parade.

I can’t say I feel proud that progress has finally been made in my country this week, though, admittedly, i am overjoyed. The fact that the federal decision to legalize gay marriage was not a landslide, that it passed by 1 measly vote, leaves me slightly bitter too. It is in bad tone though I suppose to harp on the circumstances of a clear win. 

I am not proud, I am however satisfied. Humanity, miserable as it might be en masse, does exhibit a kind of optimistic tenacity in its glacially paced bid towards progress. 

if i were gay, i’d marry this one 🙂 🙂 🙂

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On gays in the military

miscellaneous

Since 1993 openly gay, lesbian and bisexual soldiers serve without hindrance in all branches of the Israeli military, including special units. That’s over 20 years if anyone’s counting. The Israeli military recognizes same-sex couples, including widows and widowers of the same-sex.

Recently, I realized that a lot of people don’t know how much progress had been made all over the world in respect to LGBT recognition and equality. I think military policies are especially telling as far as LGBT issues go, because the military is at the core of every nation’s pride. Although U.S. is taking steps in the right direction as of the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell in 2011, the end of DADT didn’t mean what many thought it meant. It didn’t mean that LGBT military personnel would suddenly receive equal rights and fair treatment from the U.S. government. I am not harping on the fact that it has proven to be a process and that social policy, stunted by centuries of religious zealotry & bigotry, affects rate of progress, as long as progress is being made. Which admittedly it is.

Some day, hopefully soon, United States will be able to call itself a fully modernized country.